radioonsoundoff:
Hooray! I can post this!  This pinup will be in Broken Icon Comics' first issue of stuck: http://www.brokeniconcomics.com/stuckpage/

Let’s all do the new art dance!

radioonsoundoff:

Hooray! I can post this!  This pinup will be in Broken Icon Comics' first issue of stuck: http://www.brokeniconcomics.com/stuckpage/

Let’s all do the new art dance!

(via radioonsoundoff)


shingworks:

samaldencomics:

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Sam Alden, The Worm Troll, 2013

First published as Il troll dei vermi by Delebile Edizioni, available to order here.

wow… fantastic visual storytelling


stirling-greene:

Photos Of The Old Cincinnati Library

(via sagaston)


kylogram:

sunshinederp:

oops got nostalgic

still one of my favorite artbooks. 

I still have this book, I’ve owned it since it came out and it is still a constant source of inspiration.

It’s one of the first artbooks I bought with my own money, and I love it.


radioonsoundoff:

Sneak peek of a WIP. Just a bit of relaxing comfort art for a future comic project.

radioonsoundoff:

Sneak peek of a WIP. Just a bit of relaxing comfort art for a future comic project.


cliobablio:

Magical fighting girls (& cats) this Saturday night at Qpopshop.

(via typette)


radioonsoundoff:

Trying out some new brushes, drawin’ muscle girls. How you do.

Oh by the way, still not dead. :) Sneaking in doodles of Pieta before more house repairs.

radioonsoundoff:

Trying out some new brushes, drawin’ muscle girls. How you do.

Oh by the way, still not dead. :) Sneaking in doodles of Pieta before more house repairs.


Q
Do you have a 3DS?
A

D: I don’t! A fact I lament a bunch. Every day.


deltastic:

juliedillon:

eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal
We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!
However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 
The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 
The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.
And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

YES. Thank you. It makes me really uncomfortable when I hear professionals saying things like “if you drawing 24/7 you’ll never make it”, implying that having outside interests or taking care of yourself means you will fail. You undoubtedly need to be dedicated and focused to succeed as a freelancer, but what is the point of having the so-called freedom that freelancing is supposed to provide you if you can’t even leave your desk every once in a while? Exercise, get outside, socialize, have other hobbies. I’ve found I’m more productive and happier and healthier and more passionate about my work and my career when I take time off, every day, to get away from work for a little while. Building a career is important and rewarding, but your life is not comprised solely of the amount of work you are able do. Your life is not defined solely by how many hours you clock at your work desk. 

So this is something that showed up on my dash that really really spoke to me. It’s important to post and share with people, because I agree that this mentality is sick and damaging to people. I’ve been there. I’ve lived it. For years I was 100% freelance, and for two of those years I was freelance and worked on a webcomic and did nothing else. I had no outside activities, I went to conventions to do my art, barely saw people at them, and did nothing else with my life but stay inside and rarely play video games as a break. I became incredibly depressed. 
Now I have a day job, and I have tons of other hobbies that I love, I have friends I do things with weekly, and an awesome romantic life. Oftentimes I find myself feeling intensely guilty. I feel guilty when I’m not working on art, like I’m resigning myself to be sub-par and I will never accomplish the dreams or goals I have. I feel embarrassed accepting compliments on my art sometimes, because I know I could do a lot better if I was doing nothing but art 24/7/365- and that’s really sad.
People are human beings and even people who love their jobs still go home at the end of the day. Having a go-go-go all art all the time 100% mentality leads to good art for a bit, but ultimately burnout and possibly people quitting art forever. But people tend to not realize this until it’s too late, and it also is propagated by other “starving artists”. I’ve definitely felt the brunt of other artists giving that side-eye when they see things other than all art all the time going on. I think it’s something that oftentimes comes from art school, where teachers push-push-push: it works for lazy students, but for people who have a work ethic it can sour into feeling guilty for doing anything else ever. I just wanted to reblog this post because it really means a lot to me. Thanks OP!

Thanks OP! I’m happy to support all the badasses that can be art workaholics, but I can’t. My mental and physical health, work, and relationships all suffer horribly when I spend all my spare time doing what I really love.
I still struggle with not doing all the things, but that’s the downside to striving for excellence. You’ve gotta learn when you can’t take the entire world on.

deltastic:

juliedillon:

eskiworks:

The Workaholic Pedestal

We freelancers have a tendency to never truly be away from our work, regardless of the time or day of the week.  Especially if like me, your work station is in your home.  We work long hours and dedicate ourselves fully to whatever project we have at hand.  We loose sleep, skip social gatherings, eat whatever is quick and easy so we can get back to work. I have noticed that there is a sense of pride in general among freelancers that we are so in love with our work that we can dedicate ourselves this way.  Passion for your chosen profession is definitely a plus!

However, I have also observed a downside to this part of freelancing.  That dedication can cross the line into an unhealthy workaholic lifestyle, and other freelancers actually encourage it.  There is an underlying unspoken rule in freelancer culture that if you’re not working, you’re slacking.  I’ve seen other freelancers take subtle stabs at their peers for taking time off to see family, to tend to daily life, or to just have a day (or three) to simply BREATHE and do something other than art. Doing things like comparing your work load with others’ work load, making yourself out to be the harder working one.  Referring to things like showering, cooking, and cleaning as “free time” or “vacation”.  It creates or adds to guilt surrounding work, which is really not a nice thing to do to your friends and peers. 

The disclaimer here is that clearly not every freelancer does this, and I think those that do are not being purposefully malicious, so please don’t misread this as an attack.  I’m guilty of playing into this myself, we are just falling into a part of the starving artist stereotype;  The idea that your chosen craft/art must encompass ALL of your being, every day and every moment for you to truly be passionate about it. 

The truth is, there IS life outside of art and work, and it’s not a contest. We are living beings that must eat and sleep, and we are social animals that must have a connection with others.  So not only do we HAVE to do things other than art, but it’s also ok to spend time doing other things that make you happy.  It doesn’t mean you are less passionate about your work, or that other artists who spend more time on theirs love it more.

And yes, there are deadlines we must work under.  But none of us want to be starving artists. None of us enjoy loosing sleep, eating crappy or skipping meals, working our fingers to the bone, letting friendships fall apart…  These are not good things.  You aren’t a cooler or more a passionate artist for making those sacrifices.  So I think instead of putting that lifestyle on a pedestal, we should be encouraging one another to take time to care for ourselves, and to have a life outside of their work. Just like anyone else doing any other kind of work.  =)

YES. Thank you. It makes me really uncomfortable when I hear professionals saying things like “if you drawing 24/7 you’ll never make it”, implying that having outside interests or taking care of yourself means you will fail. You undoubtedly need to be dedicated and focused to succeed as a freelancer, but what is the point of having the so-called freedom that freelancing is supposed to provide you if you can’t even leave your desk every once in a while? Exercise, get outside, socialize, have other hobbies. I’ve found I’m more productive and happier and healthier and more passionate about my work and my career when I take time off, every day, to get away from work for a little while. Building a career is important and rewarding, but your life is not comprised solely of the amount of work you are able do. Your life is not defined solely by how many hours you clock at your work desk. 

So this is something that showed up on my dash that really really spoke to me. It’s important to post and share with people, because I agree that this mentality is sick and damaging to people. I’ve been there. I’ve lived it. For years I was 100% freelance, and for two of those years I was freelance and worked on a webcomic and did nothing else. I had no outside activities, I went to conventions to do my art, barely saw people at them, and did nothing else with my life but stay inside and rarely play video games as a break. I became incredibly depressed. 

Now I have a day job, and I have tons of other hobbies that I love, I have friends I do things with weekly, and an awesome romantic life. Oftentimes I find myself feeling intensely guilty. I feel guilty when I’m not working on art, like I’m resigning myself to be sub-par and I will never accomplish the dreams or goals I have. I feel embarrassed accepting compliments on my art sometimes, because I know I could do a lot better if I was doing nothing but art 24/7/365- and that’s really sad.

People are human beings and even people who love their jobs still go home at the end of the day. Having a go-go-go all art all the time 100% mentality leads to good art for a bit, but ultimately burnout and possibly people quitting art forever. But people tend to not realize this until it’s too late, and it also is propagated by other “starving artists”. I’ve definitely felt the brunt of other artists giving that side-eye when they see things other than all art all the time going on. I think it’s something that oftentimes comes from art school, where teachers push-push-push: it works for lazy students, but for people who have a work ethic it can sour into feeling guilty for doing anything else ever.

 I just wanted to reblog this post because it really means a lot to me. Thanks OP!

Thanks OP! I’m happy to support all the badasses that can be art workaholics, but I can’t. My mental and physical health, work, and relationships all suffer horribly when I spend all my spare time doing what I really love.

I still struggle with not doing all the things, but that’s the downside to striving for excellence. You’ve gotta learn when you can’t take the entire world on.

(via aphexangel)


dresdencodak:

I started Dresden Codak nine years ago. Here’s a comparison of the very first strip I uploaded with the last panel of the most recent page.
In 2005 I was a floundering 21-year-old college student with no direction and growing debt. I drew that snake comic in a statistics class I was failing, and on my way home I decided to scan it and maybe put together a website. I thought if I kept doing that, I could teach myself to draw, as a fun hobby.
Since then, this comic has become my full time job (since 2008), and last year I raised over half a million dollars in the second most successful comics Kickstarter ever. I draw what I like, I have fans all around the globe, and most fortunately, I know what I want to do with my life. In those nine years I’ve had countless people from all corners tell me I couldn’t do this or that, or that I was wasting my time trying something that had no future or point. At the end of the day, though, I can only say “I’ll show you,” and I try to do just that.
Never underestimate the power of time, hard work, and stubbornness.

dresdencodak:

I started Dresden Codak nine years ago. Here’s a comparison of the very first strip I uploaded with the last panel of the most recent page.

In 2005 I was a floundering 21-year-old college student with no direction and growing debt. I drew that snake comic in a statistics class I was failing, and on my way home I decided to scan it and maybe put together a website. I thought if I kept doing that, I could teach myself to draw, as a fun hobby.

Since then, this comic has become my full time job (since 2008), and last year I raised over half a million dollars in the second most successful comics Kickstarter ever. I draw what I like, I have fans all around the globe, and most fortunately, I know what I want to do with my life. In those nine years I’ve had countless people from all corners tell me I couldn’t do this or that, or that I was wasting my time trying something that had no future or point. At the end of the day, though, I can only say “I’ll show you,” and I try to do just that.

Never underestimate the power of time, hard work, and stubbornness.

(via rosalarian)